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Understanding the basics of hygiene is crucial to maintaining health and preventing disease. Hygiene has been THE hot topic since the Coronavirus pandemic began. While our top hygiene exercise is currently social distancing, the Center for Disease Control(CDC) has put emphasis on practices such as washing your hands often and for 20 seconds at a time, coughing and sneezing into your elbow, and staying home if you are sick.

While these are some of the most important tips, there are countless hygiene rules that we should be following throughout our everyday lives. There are two categories to describe these types of hygiene: Personal and Domestic.

Personal Hygiene

Personal Hygiene is how you take care of your body. These basic habits minimize the risk of infection and also enhance overall health.

  • Bathe regularly: Wash your body and hair often. Your body is constantly shedding skin, and that skin needs to come off.
  • Trim your nails: Keeping your finger and toenails trimmed and in good shape will prevent problems such as hang nails and infected nail beds. Keep your feet clean and dry.
  • Brush and floss your teeth: At the very least, brush your teeth twice a day and floss daily. Brushing minimizes the accumulation of bacteria in your mouth, which can cause tooth decay and gum disease.
  • Wash your hands: We all know this one… Washing your hands before preparing or eating food, after going to the bathroom, after coughing or sneezing, and after handling garbage, goes a long way toward preventing the spread of bacteria and viruses. Keep a hygiene product, like an alcohol-based sanitizing gel, handy for when soap and water isn’t available.
  • Sleep: Get plenty of rest. At least 8 hours. Lack of sleep can leave you feeling run down and can compromise your body’s natural defenses, your immune system.

Domestic Hygiene

It is also important that everything in your living space is kept clean. Rubbish and dirt build up quicker than most people realize, allowing germs and parasites to multiply and grow. This will lead to people living in the space getting sick.

Domestic hygiene activities include all the jobs which are done to keep the household and people’s clothes and bedding clean.

  • Sweeping and washing floors
  • Dusting all surfaces
  • Cleaning toilets, showers and sinks
  • Washing clothes and bedding
  • Washing dishes and cooking utensils after meals
  • Washing your pets and cleaning up after them

Additional steps that you can take to keep your household clean include:

  • Taking off shoes before entering your home: This helps lessen the chances of bringing outside bacteria into the home (ie. Animal droppings, dust, dirt, mud etc.) At the very least, keep your shoes off furniture.
  • Donating or throwing away things you don’t need: A cluttered home provides more space for bacteria to hide and grow.
  • Keeping a schedule: If you have a busy calendar, schedule time to clean so that it does not get overlooked or pushed off.

References:



If you’re a parent who is taking their kids somewhere warm for their spring break vacation, or you are finally treating yourself to that getaway vaca, look no further because the Dermacenter Medical Spa is here to tell you how to keep your skin safe in the sun!

Sure, going on vacation is a blast, and it feels wonderful to soak up all that natural Vit D, but the last thing you want is to come back with more sun spots, freckles, or worse.. a sunburn! To help keep your skin protected while enjoying beach days, we have created a short list of tips to help you coming back relaxed with no sun damage!

Pack a face sunscreen separate from your body sunscreen!

It’s important that you use at least an SPF 30 on your body (in a perfect world you would use SPF 50), but when it comes to your face it is not only important to use SPF 50 but to make sure it has either ingredient: Zinc or Titanium. Having either of these ingredients in your SPF turns your sunscreen into a physical sunblock. Physical sunscreens block both UVA and UVB rays, which not only prevent sunburns but prevents your skin from aging! It’s also important to invest in a good facial sunscreen so that you don’t end up having other issues, like congestion and acne breakouts!

Our favorite products we carry are Epionce Tinted SPF 50 and GLO Tinted SPF 30. We love the tinted SPF, because it gives you a nice glow at the beach without having to wear make up!

Reapply your sunscreen!

Make sure you are reapplying your sunscreen at least every two hours (more often if you go into the water). Water is reflective, and can put your skin at a higher risk of getting burned. By reapplying your sunscreen at least every two hours, you can prevent your skin from getting burned!

Your moisturizer that has sunscreen in it is not good enough!

When you really think about what your moisturizer is doing for you (penetrates your skin to moisturize), and what your sunblock is doing for you (sits on your skin acting like a barrier to protect you from the sun). Ask yourself, how can one product be doing both effectively!? Exactly, it can’t!! Make sure your sunblock is separate from your moisturizer, and should be the last thing that goes on your face, prior to your make up!

Buy yourself a fabulous new hat

Not only are big hats in this season, but talk about skin protection!! Not only will you look glamorous on the beach, but your face will thank you!

What happens if you end up with sun spots on your face?

We can remove sunspots, freckles, age spots with a laser treatment called IPL. Before getting this treatment, you need to make sure you do not have tan skin when you get this treatment done. You must have been out of the sun for at least 4 weeks, not be on any photosensitizing medications, and not have used any retinol type products in the past week. Our consultations are free, so give us a call at 215-735-7990 or stop by the front desk to schedule your consultation today!



Remember, your pharmacist is a part of your healthcare provider team. It is important that you take the opportunity to ask your pharmacist key questions that will help you understand your prescribed therapy. How much you know about your prescribed medication will help empower you to optimize the way you comply with your therapy and potentially enhance the intended therapeutic benefit. Here are a few questions to ask your pharmacist regarding your prescribed medications:

  • Will this prescription interact with my current medications?
  • When should I ideally take this medication?
  • How should I take this medication; ie. With or without food, avoiding certain foods…
  • What are some side effects (adverse events) that I should be aware of?
  • Is the dose for this medication fixed? Or may I adjust based on my symptoms?
  • Are there generic forms for this medication with identical therapeutic benefit?
  • I take …(mention any over the counter supplements you may be taking)…, will any of these over the counter supplements potentially interact with this prescription medication?
  • If I miss a dose, should I attempt to make up for it by taking it once I remember, or should I stick with the prescription schedule allowing for a missed dose?
  • Is there anything specific to this medication that I haven’t considered that I should know about? Please assume that even the most elementary points are of interest to me.

Your healthcare provider team works hard to collaborate, optimize and calculate your therapy. You should know that you are also an integral factor in your therapeutic outcomes. Join the team by ensuring you ask the questions above and become an engaged team member for your greater health outcomes.



As winter sets in and we enter the coldest months of the season, we often start to feel and see the effects on our health. Winter poses unique health problems that we do not generally see throughout the year due to colder temperatures, less hours of daylight and less access to fresh and healthy foods. If we are aware of what may be coming our way over the next few months implementing a few easy things into your life can prevent winter from getting the best of you.

  • Common cold/flu/sore throat/cough

It is no surprise to anyone that you are more likely to get sick during the winter and this year has been especially bad for many of our patients. While the cold weather does not cause the viruses, we are spending more time indoors and in close proximity of each other, which allows viruses to spread easily. The cardinal rule to avoiding viruses and bacteria is hand washing. Whether you work in an open plan office, ride SEPTA to work or stay at home with your children, washing hands often and thoroughly with warm soapy water can help keep many of the viruses and bacteria at bay. As with any illness, when you start to feel that tickle in your throat or increase in fatigue, listen to your body. It is best not to try to push through. Start to increase hydration, rest and limit exposure to the cold air. If you are feeling sick, we always recommend avoiding public spaces to protect others around you. If you have been feeling unwell for a few days or weeks and feel you need to be evaluated in our office, we try to keep appointment slots open daily for you to be seen.

  • Dry skin

With increase in hand washing and a decrease in moisture in the air our skin starts to dry and can sometimes even crack. Using an unscented cream or Vaseline on the dry areas between hand washing or bathing can help replenish the skins hydration. Another simple solution for dry skin is increasing water intake, this will rehydrate your skin from inside out. Avoid harsh soaps, and use warm water rather than hot water when bathing to prevent stripping your skin of its natural moisture. It is also recommended to use a humidifier in your bedroom while you sleep to counter the dry air coming from heaters.

  • Poor indoor air quality

We tend to spend more time indoors with windows shut and heaters going during the winter. To ensure that the air you are breathing is clean make sure to change your air filters, vacuum and dust surfaces more often than normal and wash your bed linens regularly. If you are using heaters or have a fireplace, make sure you have working smoke and carbon monoxide detectors installed in your home.

  • Seasonal depression or winter blues

Even if you do not have seasonal depression or seasonal affective disorder it is not uncommon to feel more lethargic and less happy during the winter months. Days are shorter and nights are longer and getting into sunlight and outside regularly can be a challenge. Do you best to stick to your normal routine throughout the year, plan activities to get you out of the house and keep up with exercise and activity. It can feel hard to get up and go in the winter, but finding a friend or partner to do this with you can help you get there and keep your mood lifted.

  • Weight gain

As winter sets in we start to lean into comfort foods and foods that are convenient. There is also a lack of fresh vegetables in the winter that make our meals less bright and healthy. Make sure to make your meals as colorful as possible with a variety of vegetables and lean proteins. Canned and frozen vegetables can make that easier during winter months or try a new winter vegetable or recipe you have never tried before! And as always, get out and get moving for at least 30 minutes per day.

Be proactive about your health this season. We are still offering flu vaccines at the office and it is not too late to get yours. Wash your hands regularly, cover your mouth when you cough or sneeze. Stay active and engaged with friends and family. And as always, stay hydrated and listen to your body when it needs a bit more rest than normal.



Celebrating American Heart Month every February provides an annual opportunity to reflect on our lifestyle choices, and how these impact our cardiovascular health. Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) is the leading killer of both men and women in the U.S. (and increasingly, worldwide).  CVD includes Coronary Artery Disease, Stroke, and Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD).  Many of the biggest risk factors for CVD-related morbidity and mortality are preventable and modifiable.  Smoking, overweight/obesity, poor diet, and inactivity all contribute to increased CVD risk.  Modifying these risk factors, in turn, can prevent/improve other well-known risks, including Hypertension, Diabetes, and High cholesterol.

Smoking is perhaps the biggest modifiable risk factor for CVD—don’t start!  Stopping smoking will start lowering one’s cardiovascular risk within months, and within years, a former smoker’s risk is equivalent to that of a nonsmoker.  It really is never too late to quit, from a cardiovascular perspective.

Improving one’s diet improves heart heath independently, but also by reducing other CVD risk factors such as obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, and high cholesterol. Following a diet which includes plenty of fruits and vegetables, fiber, monounsaturated fats, and foods with a low glycemic index, as well as 2-3 servings of seafood weekly (a great source of omega-3 fatty acids), is advised.  The Mediterranean Diet is a great example of a heart-healthy diet strategy.

Physical activity is one of the most critical tools for reducing one’s CVD risk and for weight loss.  Most experts recommend 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity a week for heart health (less if you are exercising more vigorously).  Conversely, studies have also shown that prolonged periods of inactivity, such as sitting at work or watching TV, can increase your cardiovascular risk significantly.  The answer—get up and get moving!   Even lower-intensity exercise such as brisk walking makes a difference.

Making therapeutic lifestyle changes can have a tremendous impact on your cardiovascular health.  It can be daunting to alter longstanding habits, but the benefits are immeasurable.  Enlist help if you need it—see a nutritionist, get a trainer, set up a lunchtime walking date with a coworker or an office appointment to discuss medication for smoking cessation—whatever it takes!   Your heart is worth it!



It is after hours and you are experiencing health-related concerns. Your PCP is not available; you have two options: urgent care or emergency room.  What is the difference and which one should you choose?

Simply put, the difference is the severity of the health problem. If the condition is life-threatening and your care may require rapid or advanced treatments, go to an emergency room. If you have a minor illness or injury that needs to be treated right away, but is not a true emergency, go to an urgent care.

At Rittenhouse Women’s Wellness Center, we encourage all of our patients to contact us if you are experiencing any type of health related issue. While in most cases we will recommend you come into our office to be evaluated, sometimes we will not be able to see you as quickly as an urgent care or an emergency room would. Even if we cannot be the ones to see you, we want to help you make a decision on what to do next.

As a guide…

Here are symptoms that are best evaluated in an urgent care:

  • Fever without a rash
  • Vomiting or persistent diarrhea
  • Abdominal pain
  • Wheezing or shortness of breath
  • Dehydration
  • Moderate flu-like symptoms
  • Sprains and strains
  • Small cuts that may require stitches

Here are symptoms that are best evaluated in an emergency room:

  • Chest pain or difficulty breathing
  • Weakness/numbness on one side
  • Slurred speech
  • Fainting/change in mental state
  • Serious burns
  • Head or eye injury
  • Concussion/confusion
  • Broken bones and dislocated joints
  • Fever with a rash
  • Seizures
  • Severe cuts that may require stitches
  • Facial lacerations
  • Severe cold or flu symptoms
  • Vaginal bleeding with pregnancy


Even though it is often referred to as, “the most wonderful time of the year,” the holiday season can also be very challenging for many.

While the festivities and the advent of a new year are fun and exciting, the holidays also present an endless amount of demands — parties, shopping, baking, cleaning, and entertaining, to name just a few.  As a result, many people find that they are faced with an increase in stress, anxiety and depression throughout the holiday season.  In fact, according to a poll by the American Psychological Association, eight out of ten people anticipate increased stress over the holidays. In some cases, the increase in stress and anxiety may even lead to depression.

However, there are many ways to minimize stress, anxiety and depression so you can relax and enjoy this time of year.  Try out some (or all!) of these tips for a happy and healthy holiday season:

  1. Be intentional with your actions and time. The first step toward discipline begins with you getting organized. Using a schedule is your best friend. But, each thing that fills a slot on your scheduling needs to be for a particular reason, not “just because.”
  2. Be selfish … in prioritizing your well-being. You can’t take care of others if you aren’t taking care of yourself! One of the first things people let go around this time of the year are their healthy routines and behaviors.  You don’t need to be perfect with your routine, but strive for consistency.
  3. Be health-conscious. Don’t let the holidays become a free-for-all. Overindulgence only adds to your stress and guilt.
  4. Get plenty of sleep. Make sure you are getting at least 7-8 hours of sleep per night.
  5. Get moving! Incorporate regular physical activity into each day. Even a 20 minute walk can help with fighting off anxiety and stress.
  6. Make some time for yourself. Find something that reduces stress by clearing your mind, slowing your breathing and restoring your inner calm.
  7. Be realistic about your expectations. The holidays don’t have to be perfect or just like last year. Life is messy, and beauty lies in the unexpected.
  8. Seek professional help if you need it. Despite your best efforts, you may find yourself feeling persistently sad or anxious, plagued by physical complaints, unable to sleep, irritable and hopeless, and unable to face routine chores. If these feelings last for a while, talk to your doctor or a mental health professional.


Winter is just around the corner—the days are getting shorter and the holidays are upon us. Winter can be a depressing time of year for many as the holidays wrap up, the hours of darkness increase, and the temps continue to drop. However, cooler temps have a number of health benefits including: the ability to burn more calories, fight infections, and clear up skin—all of which can make the holiday season and winter months a little brighter.

When exposed to the cold our bodies are constantly working to keep us warm and regulate our core body temps. This process uses a significant amount of energy and burns calories in the process. Exposing your body to cooler temps also helps to increase your amount of brown fat. Brown fat is mitochondria rich fat which helps to boost your metabolism making it easier to burn more calories and indulge in a few extra holiday treats.

Throughout the winter we are exposed to more viruses, such as the common cold and the flu. However, cold winter weather enhances our immune system. Studies have shown that stress-inducing conditions, such as exposing yourself to cold temperatures, activates the immune system. Additionally, during the winter months allergies are low and sleep is enhanced further increasing the body’s ability to fight infections. While we may be more at risk, we are better able to fight off infections in the winter months.

Lastly, cooler temps make for clearer skin. When skin is exposed to moderately cool temps the blood vessels constrict, meaning there is a decrease in blood flow to the vessels closest to the skin. This constriction leads to less redness and inflammation. Plus, during colder months your skin naturally produces less oil and sebum the culprit of acne breakouts. Despite these benefits winter can also be very drying to the skin so it is extremely important to continue to moisturize throughout the winter as much as possible to give your skin that nice flawless winter glow.

To read more about the health benefits of clearer skin you can follow this link.

https://www.netdoctor.co.uk/beauty/a27237/reasons-why-the-cold-weather-is-actually-good-for-your-skin



As Climate Week comes to an end, I would like to share some of the things I have learned over the past six months thanks to my daughter Julia and her increased involvement in preserving the environment. Not only was it a great excuse to spend time working on this article together, but we were able to collect categorized recommendations on how to alter everyday habits to better help the environment. While we are sure we have not covered everything, these tips are a great place to start.

Beauty Recommendations

  1. Use shampoo and conditioner bars. This will save on water, packaging and money since the bars last longer.  Some of the manufacturer’s include Lush (they will give you a free container of a face mask if you return 5 empty face mask containers!) Human Kind, Sterling Soap Company, Skin & Company, and Naples Soap Company.
  2. Use Safety Razors. These razors do not rust, are cost efficient, and are not plastic, therefore can eventually be recycled.
  3. Dental products. You can use Bamboo toothbrushes in place of plastic toothbrushes.  Tooth tabs can replace your toothpaste.  Biodegradable floss is also available.   If you are resourceful, you can make your own toothpaste, mouth wash, and deodorant.

Food

  1. Meatless Mondays. Cutting back on meat will contribute to less water waste and decreases your carbon footprint.
  2. Composting companies. There are entities that will pick up your compost (for a small monthly fee) or you can drop it off at a facility.  Two recommendations are Bennet Compost and Circle Compost.  Typically, there are composting areas located at Farmer’s Markets.
  3. Buying locally sourced foods and in season foods. This is healthy because there is not as much cost and carbon expense involved.  This also helps support local and often smaller businesses.
  4. Buy in bulk! This means that you can go to a local bulk store or Whole Foods (call ahead, not all of them have this option), whichever is more convenient.  Bring your own glass container or cloth produce bag, which can be an amazing way to stop using small plastic bags.  These containers can be used for cereal, vegetables, pasta, nuts, beans, etc.  If you are wondering what products can come in bulk, it is basically anything that a vegan could eat… grains, oils, candy, flour, and everything else I mentioned earlier! By doing this it cuts down one use plastic packaging.

Storage

  1. Water bottles. Metal water bottles are always the best option, because by using a single-use plastic water bottle, you are exposing yourself to microplastics that will contaminate the water by seeping into it. They are also extremely cost efficient. The average human spends over 1000 dollars on single-use plastic bottles per year, but you can change that by buying a good quality metal bottle that will last for an extremely long time.
  2. Bring your own supplies. I have to admit this takes getting used to. I remember being very surprised when I watched my daughter pull out a metal teaspoon from home so I would not use a plastic spoon supplied by the local ice cream vendor.   Bringing a reusable bag cuts down on needing to use a single-use plastic bag.   Other states and countries charge for supplying plastic bags, which is a good deterrent.  It has been nice to see stores supplies these reusable bags instead of paper or plastic bags.
  3. BUY GLASS/METAL. Seek out metal cans or foods stored in glass containers.  By buying items in these containers, you allow them to be recycled unlike buying the same product in a plastic container that will not biodegrade.

Miscellaneous:

  1. Earthhero is a good source for zero waste products. Like wax storage wrap, zero waste gum (it does not contain plastic and artificial ingredients like traditional gum) and bamboo or glass straws.
  2. Using the real stuff when you can. What I mean by this is, if you have access to silverware, glasses and plates, use them instead of plastic or paper plates.  Remember, paper plates have a plastic layer to keep them from breaking down easily, hence, not making them biodegradable.
  3. Using public transportation or carpooling whenever possible is an obvious way to cut down on our carbon footprint.
  4. Keep in mind that even when we recycle, these products needs to be stored or burned somewhere and this also contributes to pollution. Frequently, this takes place in poorer neighborhoods.  The goal is to have zero waste, so no one would be subject to extra pollution.

I would also like to recommend looking into joining some organizations that are helping to push these changes locally.  A group started by young activists is the Sunrise Movement and Philly Thrive is working to keep the pollution down by fighting to keep the local refinery closed.  Keep in mind, that any individual mindfulness is always going to be helpful, but the bigger changes need to come through industry changes, and we can be more successful as a group.


25/Sep/2019

I frequently get asked about what you can do to help with bags under the eyes. We are born with three fat pads under our eyes, and as we get older this fat can start to herniate. Swelling in this area can also be an issue with fluid accumulating around your eyes. The good news is, there are a few different options to treat bags under the eyes!

I always recommend starting with the least invasive treatments, and if you aren’t getting the results you wish, then you can move to the next option.

At-home Remedies that can help with bags under the eyes:

  1. Cool compresses. – Put 2 spoons in your freezer, and every morning place the spoons over your eyes for 5 to 10 minutes.
  2. Stay hydrated! This might mean to also cut back on your alcohol.
  3. Allergies can cause puffiness around your eyes. If you suffer from allergies, trying taking a Claritin or Zyrtec during the day and Benadryl at night.
  4. Sleep with an extra pillow so your head is elevated a bit more. This helps prevent the pooling of fluid in your face and around your eyes.
  5. SLEEP! It’s so important to get 8 hours of sleep!
  6. Cut back on the salty foods! Salt causes fluid retention and can make you puffy everywhere not just your eyes.

Next Step –> Skin treatments:

Microneedling – This treatment stimulates collagen and also helps with tone and texture of the skin. With this treatment, you won’t get instant gratification. You will need 3-6 treatments spaced about 1 month apart. The downtime is about 48 hours, in which you are red and should not wear any makeup. You also need to be careful about sun exposure after this treatment. To expedite the healing process and for better results, you can opt to include PRP (Platelet-Rich Plasma), also known as the Vampire Facial.

Next Step –> Injections:

HA (hyaluronic acid) Fillers are great for bags and hollowness under the eyes. It is the only form of filler that is safe to inject in this area. My favorite product to use for under eyes is Restylane. This procedure takes about 15-30 minutes and costs roughly $600. The results last about 1 year and you can expect 40%-60% improvement. It is extremely important you are being treated by someone with the correct credentials as well as someone who has been performing this treatment for years. There is potential for bruising so you want to make sure you don’t have any events coming up within the next two weeks. Results are instant but you can have a little extra swelling from the injections, this can take a few days up to two weeks to completely go away.

Next Step –> Surgery:

If all else fails, there is a surgery that you can have done that removes these 3 fat pads under your eyes. It’s called a Lower Blepharoplasty. Some Plastic Surgeons require you to have general anesthesia for this procedure, and others perform this procedure under conscious sedation. The actual procedure itself takes roughly 10-15 minutes per eye, there are no sutures and scaring as they make the incision inside your eyelid. You can expect to have a great deal of bruising and swelling in this area that can last a few weeks. The nice thing about this treatment, the results are fantastic and they are permanent


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1632 Pine Street
Philadelphia, PA 19103
Phone: 215-735-7992
Fax: 215-735-7991
Email: info@rwwc.com

Hours

Monday – Friday:  8am – 8pm

Saturday: 9am – 2pm

Sunday: Closed

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